Category Archives: independent movies

Legendary Rochester Video Store, and Major Influence on TUGM, Shutting Down After 41 Years

Hyatt’s Classic Video (3rd location) (Courtesy: Rochester City Newspaper)

by Legendary Lew

In 1976 when Kodak was booming, and Rochester NY was, as a local newspaper crowed, “The Oz of the East,” Bob Hyatt expanded his 10 year-old stereo business into the brand new market of home video. He began acquiring Beta tapes of popular feature films and renting them to folks in the community and surrounding area. Soon, Hyatt’s Classic Video became a mecca for those who searched for a wide variety of titles from all over the world. Known for his tendency to “pack rat” videos and formats, he kept Betas, VHS, VideoDiscs, DVDs and even 8mm video features (used in the 1980s primarily on airlines) for as long as he could possibly keep them.

Hyatt’s Classic Video, located in East Rochester, New York, was more than a video store for me. I worked there for a few years in the late 1990s, but was a steady customer for a long time before that.

While I worked at Hyatt’s, I took the opportunity to check out and view the most mind-blowing collection of odd movies and TV shows I could have ever seen before the advent of the internet. Only the tragically short-lived Buffalo video store, Mondo Video, could come close to the strangeness of his collection.

But Bob didn’t really set out to gather the weirdest movies ever. He wanted the largest, so as to appeal to as much of the community as possible. From family features to art house obscurities, Bob had them all. He also, out of necessity for any indie video store to remain alive, had porn ranging all the way back to the 1970s. In fact, his insistence on stocking adult films from the very dawn of video ensured a devoted audience who shied away from the “plastic figures” of later DTV smut.

During the time I worked there, Hyatt’s had monthly rental specials for titles beginning with randomly selected letters of the alphabet. Looking through the lists, I began to wonder what certain mysterious titles were. This was before I had internet access, so looking up titles on IMDB was yet to be a convenience.

I searched through the VHS titles and decided to watch all the titles I did not recognize, especially those that were distributed by second line distributors. No MGMs nor Paramounts for me. I was watching titles from Sinister Cinema, Paragon, Gorgon and Vestron Video.

And boy, did that change my movie viewing life! Titles like Sweet Sugar, The Jar, The Cars That Ate Paris, W (from the Philippines), One-Armed Executioner, Circle of Power, The Killing of Satan, Beyond the Doors, The Loved One and many more astounded me. With the blessing of Bob, I created a photocopied newsletter of sorts, reviewing those and other selected strange titles. Once unknown neglected cult movies, sitting on the shelves literally collecting dust, began moving, and encouraged some lively chat with astounded customers.

This reaction fed a passion and obsession for unusual and strange cult movies that lives to this day. I carried it forward to Chicago, my new home, where brick and mortar video stores like Facets and Odd Obsession became my new searching grounds. With the explosion of digital sources, some of the finds became easier and with better visual quality. The marketability of cult movies, thanks to the success of directors like Quentin Tarantino, increased the likelihood of finding strange movies finally released on DVD.

Even so, some titles in Hyatt’s collection still haven’t seen a digital release. Finding them is the glory of browsing brick and mortar video stores.

Which makes the impending closure of Hyatt’s Classic Video a shame. However, I don’t take this as something that’s necessarily sad.

Hyatt’s Classic Video was an astounding success. It remained in business as a video store for 41 years!  I don’t know of any video store, independent or otherwise, that has lasted as long as Hyatt’s.  If so, it certainly has not been within the area.

It fought off other competing indies as well as Blockbuster Videos–4 of them surrounded Hyatt’s within a 3 mile radius at one point. Blockbuster actually was born and collapsed while Hyatt’s survived. Bob made the decision not to sell to Blockbuster at a crucial time during the 1990s and I’m so glad he saved the store.

Bob’s decision, in no small way, changed my life. It generated the interest and excitement for weird movies that I eventually carried to Night School (some of the movies I presented, I had first seen when I rented them from Hyatt’s) and will definitely be one of the acorn seeds that develops into Vital Media later this year and into 2018. I know for a fact that the store has influenced other media makers and film lovers.

So Hyatt’s Classic Video will soon be no more. But the spirit of indie will carry on with this site, Thrillo Pad Productions and all my future work.

Thanks to The Hyatt Family.

 

Flashback: Director Joseph Lewis Discusses His Film “Tyler B Nice”

Cast of

Cast of “Tyler B Nice” (l. to r.) Tyler Jenich, Director Joseph Lewis, Emilia Richeson

by Legendary Lew

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the production of the Joseph Lewis feature, Tyler B Nice, the strange film about a party gone wrong. It’s gotten the critical acclaim of people like Andrew Bujalski and is really due for a discovery.

We present here comments by the director and TUGM co-founder Joseph R. Lewis. His statements from ten years ago still hold truth for those who want to get the best results in independent media.

Oscar-Nominated Director Lexi Alexander Supports File-Sharing & Copyright Reform in One of the Best Damn Posts Ever Written on the Subject

lexialexander

by Legendary Lew

Oscar-nominated director Lexi Alexander came out swinging in a pro-file sharing post on her blog a couple of days ago, and man oh man, is it a doozy.

Alexander does a brilliant job calling out Hollywood for its faults, while also venting her frustration with pirates who belittle the art of filmmaking. I urge you to read her entire post on file-sharing, but I want to share with you this great passage from her post:

“We’re at the point where a studio consciously makes a shitty sequel, about which the filmmaker publicly states that he knows it’s shit (I don’t have to mention his name, you all know him) but that he couldn’t give two fucks…because all those stupid people out there will go buy a ticket anyway (and they did, as we now know)…File-sharers on the other hand don’t have a dog in this fight. They just care about good entertainment. That’s what I love about torrent sites, their illegal status has one huge advantage: No studio manipulation or propaganda. Go on any legal site and you’re instantly bombarded with “a-five-star-adventure” slogan pulled from reviews published in outlets whose main income is…you guessed it: Movie Studio advertisements. You know what it takes for an indie movie, which doesn’t get the reviews or the marketing budget, to stand out from all that crap? Word of mouth. Guess who can give you the strongest word of mouth campaign ever? That’s right, file sharers. Don’t believe me? Google UNTHINKABLE, MAN FROM EARTH, INK, etc.

Oh, Lexi, I love you!

Alexander points out that she’s one of the few vocal proponents of file-sharing (thank you, Lexi, for not calling it “piracy,” a term I thought was dumb to use from the beginning). The file-sharing fight will become a major irony in a few years, because 1) some Hollywood people support her views and are closeted about them so they already exist and share files, and 2) Hollywood will have to eventually deal with the existence of a fully-functioning torrent system that can evade all attempts to shut them all down. As I’ve mentioned in the past here on TUGM, most of Hollywood doesn’t understand they are missing out on PR opportunities supporting free torrent sites instead of their “cloud”streaming ripoffs. Alexander touches on this topic as well.

The Hollywood system of production and distribution sucks and is a reason to stop watching Hollywood movies.

Here’s a clip of director Lexi Alexander speaking to MSU students: