Tag Archives: comedy

BREAKING: Roy Moore Taps Milo Yiannopoulos for Campaign

Roy Moore

Milo Yiannopoulos

by Ida Dunnett

Roy Moore, the Alabama Republican candidate for senate, has asked controversial “alt-right” celebrity Milo Yiannopoulos to campaign for him statewide. This comes just after a fifth woman came forward to accuse the embattled candidate of sexual assault.

“I don’t generally tap into young people,” Moore explained, “but I think this is a good opportunity to take advantage of what Milo has to offer my campaign.”

Yiannopoulos, who is openly gay, recently resigned from his senior editor position at Breitbart News after a video surfaced where he defended sexual relationships between 13 year-olds and adult men and women. Breitbart News, in contrast, has continued to support Moore.

Moore has also condemned homosexuality as a “crime against nature” and compared it to bestiality.

For his part, Yiannopoulos finds his involvement as a positive development.

“I think Roy Moore could be great influence on young people.” he said in a statement. “For teenagers, there’s no doubt Moore would be the perfect fit.”

When asked about the potential conflicts of having Yiannopoulos speaking on behalf of his campaign, Moore defended the decision.

“Milo knows he is sinful, which is something I wish all homosexuals would understand.” Moore stated. “He has the potential of bringing very young people into the campaign. The witch hunt against me by some Republicans are from the very old. Guys who’ve been there forever. I want them younger, much younger. I want them young.”

Moore is facing multiple allegations of sexual assault from women who claimed the abuses occurred when some of them were as young as fourteen years old. The candidate has denied the charges against him.

Should he win the election, Moore has promised a position for the provocateur.

“The first job he’ll have is to give the Senate office a makeover.”

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The Debut of Vital Indie Media: TUGM’s Vlog of Unusual Movies, TV, Music, Games and other Ephemera!

by Legendary Lew

This has been a long time coming. Vital Indie Media is now a reality!

Vital Indie Media is the new vlog series (monthly, but can be more frequent with your help) concentrating on my collection of weird movies, TV shows, music, games and other strange stuff.  The debut episode features the unusual board game, The Bottom Line.

The main focus, however, will be independent and cult movies. Non-Hollywood movies have an uphill battle to gain any sort of attention. Media machines, eager to siphon as much profit as possible through manufactured big-budget exports to China, are on overdrive for your eyes and ears.

Other programs on YouTube have an interest in the latest releases from DC Comics, Hasbro, Marvel Comics and other corporate conglomerates.

Not me.

I’m in the fight to help the small voices out there.

The indie filmmakers who can barely scrape enough money to get their dream projects released.

The producers who shy away from biased festivals, some of which are downright scams.

The remaining indie video stores that remain open for cinephiles, despite the constant drive to digital.

The DVD companies that brave releasing unusual movies from all over the world, while conglomerate media studios hoard their “vaults” to release expensive burns, often with no remastering nor extras.

Vital Indie Media is my small contribution to the fight, but it’s truly vital for me. Come join me!

Chicago Cubs End the Punchlines and Change Comedy

cubsby Legendary Lew

The curse was broken last night. The Chicago Cubs won its first World Series since 1908.

What the ’16 Cubs did also is forever break the age old tradition of portraying the team as perennial losers. To me, this was the most notable effect of the win. Comedy writers can no longer lazily rely on a Cubs joke to portray losers nor to portray a Cubs World Series win as an Earth-shattering future event.

Indiewire reminds us of the numerous Cubs references in TV and film.

However, I give my salute to the Cubs by showing what could arguably be their lowest point. 1983 Cubs manager Lee Elia went on a profane tear after a brutal loss to the Dodgers in a game. AP reporter Les Grobstein was the only reporter with a recorder on when Elia went off.

The infamous rant became one of the most noted in sports history, inspiring a producer (rumored to be Mike Bisbee) to come up with a great Cubs promo parody (NSFW):

Elia’s rant was the first thing I thought about when the Cubs won last night. Here was a guy defending a team at the lowest point, when he felt the city was not even supporting them. He even noted that two of his players were being harassed after the loss. Sure, he did insult fans, but under the pressure, could you blame him?

He was later fired, but I salute the guy who stood by his team even when they were the perennial losers, the joke of the sports world.

I hope Lee Elia’s enjoying the win and that he gets the credit he deserves for standing by his team.

Legendary Lew is the co-founder of The Underground Multiplex and host of the podcast “Mediatrocities.” You can support the current Go Fund Me campaign for updated equipment at: www.gofundme.com/HelpTUGM

Hilarious Animated Short Based on Actual Court Transcripts

by Legendary Lew

The folks at Polyglot Platypus just uploaded a good video version of an animated actual court document interpretation.  Shown at San Diego’s Comic Con, Justin Rolland reads the transcript in the voices of Adult Swim’s Rick and Morty. It’s profane, hilarious and a savage indictment of the justice system we have currently. It’s amazing how this court unraveled very quickly and got completely out of hand.

This is quite simply better than a dozen seasons of Judge Judy put together. Screw Hollywood blockbusters. I’d love to see more of this type of entertainment. NSFW

CLOSING NIGHT: “Incendium” by Chicago Slam Works

Incendium_Goldstar

~ by Ty Pi

March 4th, 2016 was the closing night of the world premiere of the Chicago Slam Works production of Incendium.  I had a chance to see their previous show, Handsome Animals, which explored the social construction of body image and gender.  The production was directed by J.W. Basillo and the writing team was led by Teagan Walsh-Davis.  I enjoyed that production quite a bit and eagerly awaited the chance to see their followup production, Incendium.  I attended on their closing night and I was not disappointed.

The structure of the two Chicago Slam Works productions mentioned here are rooted in poetry.  Handsome Animals delivered its content through a series of poems and short scenes.  Basillo once again helms Incendium (written by the performers), which presents itself more like a cabaret set on a black box stage at Stage 773.  The show comes equipped with not just poetry, but also songs, juggling, acrobatics, a burlesque number, and the occasional breaking of the fourth wall, going as far as to have the audience directly involved.  It goes against the norms of theatre and is performed with a great sense of fun.  Within this abstract circus lies one central theme: Death.  The concept of death is explored throughout most of the play, if not all of it.

For this theatre patron, their presentation of that theme is what not only made this ride worthwhile, but also necessary.  The production makes a heavy emphasis on how life is temporary, memories fade, life can be miserable, and death is inevitable.  Although these points are repeated, it works because these are all too true.  These theme are supported by the show’s examinations of time, individual identity, one’s sense of purpose in the world, and even the feeling of boredom.  The more I think about it, Incendium does not just make death a theme, but also more of a statement.  In a person’s lifetime, one will experience hardships, feelings of boredom, contemplate their sense of purpose in the world, memories of their life will fade, and until someone discovers the cure for mortality, death is inevitable.  Life is a temporary experience and we only get to do it once.

I am reminded of a quote from Orson Welles in his documentary, F for Fake.  “Our songs will all be silenced.  But what of it?  Go on singing!  Maybe a man’s name doesn’t matter all that much.”  Although such themes can be seen as too downbeat or morose, the show has a sense of fun about it, and at times becomes self-deprecating.  The play explores that when one of the performers named Noob (Joseph Ramski) tries to bring optimism into the situation, only to be crushed by everyone in a fashion that can be described as humorous cynicism.  My takeaway from that is that it’s easy to be cynical about life and death, but it does not change anything.  Instead of remaining pessimistic about it all, I felt the play encouraged me to become more optimistic and happy that I even get to experience life at all.

I extend my congratulations to the Chicago Slam Works cast and crew for their efforts to bring Incendium to life.  Although the run of the show has ended, their next production will premiere at Stage 773 on May 6th, 2016.  It is called This Great Nation, Much Enduring.  I was informed that this production will be about America.  Already, I am looking forward to seeing it, and I encourage you to head to their website to learn more about the poetry-forward company.

Scumbabies is on Fandependent Films for Viewing

scumbabiesbannerby Legendary Lew

Joseph R. Lewis’ award-winning feature, Scumbabies, is on Fandependent Films to view for free. If you have not yet seen this film, I daresay do so.

Oh, okay I’ll admit it. In the interests of disclosure, Scumbabies is a production of The Underground Multiplex.

However, the website hosting the feature currently (Fandependent Films) is run by Ben Hicks and Jerry Tran, two filmmakers who respect the hard work and artistry of other filmmakers who struggle with tiny budgets and few venues to display their works properly.

Their current Winter 2016 Film Festival is on with Scumbabies competing against a number of other films to vie for permanent collection status at Fandependent.  Please head on over and become a fan of Scumbabies. Help us win an Audience Award. There are only 20 days from this writing to do so!

Watch and become a fan of Scumbabies on Fandependent Films .
Learn about Scumbabies. from TUGM.

 

RIP Stan Freberg, the Godfather of Modern Media Satire

Stan Freberg

Stan Freberg

by  Legendary Lew

At the risk of having TUGM seem morbid by reporting the third celebrity death in as many days, this is one that just can’t be ignored.

Stan Freberg, who died at age 88, was a comic force whose influence is immeasurable.  Decades before Saturday Night Live and SCTV, Freberg took aim at pop cultural institutions like radio, television, rock & roll and advertising.  His penchant for great comic writing, along with legendary voice actors helping out like Daws Butler and June Foray, lead to some of the most memorable comedy discs ever recorded. One such classic is “John and Marsha,” a soap opera with John and Marsha speaking only each other’s names with varying emotions:

The record that change comedy recordings forever was “St. George and the Dragonet,” a Number One smash in 1953.  Not only was it a narrative comic record–as opposed to a musical one–but it satirized a popular TV show, “Dragnet.”  Daws Butler voiced the knave, June Foray voiced the maiden and future TV director Hy Averback (“F Troop”) was the announcer. Here’s the classic 45 given an animated treatment:

Despite a string of great comedy records, Freberg will probably be most known for his incredible work on commercials. Using the same satirical bent, Freberg went after old TV shows and Hollywood musicals at a time when commercials seemed too stuffy and serious. In the case of Sunsweet pitted prunes, he even poked fun at one of the product’s supposed drawbacks with his friend, the legendary Ray Bradbury showing up on a large screen. Only Freberg could have thought of this:

Here are two other masterful commercials from the great mind of Freberg. Ann Miller for Heinz Great American Soups and Jeno’s Pizza Rolls.

There’ll never be another like him.