Tag Archives: political comedy

Michael Cohen Threatens Donald Trump (audio) NSFW

by Lew Ojeda

Well, Michael Cohen is guilty but he’s not going down without a fight. Audio from the upcoming comedy album “Donald J. Trump: A Very White House Con Job” NSFW.

BTW, your contributions on my bandcamp page can help us get this comedy album released sooner. Thanks!

https://lewojeda.bandcamp.com/track/michael-cohen-threatens-donald-trump

 

 

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Anti-Trump Political Comedy Album Debuts on Wednesday and the Timing Could Not Have Been Better

From cartoonist David Rowe

by Legendary Lew

This coming Wednesday, July 18 marks the public debut of a comedy album I’ve been working on since February this year.

“Donald J. Trump: A Very White House Con Job” is the story of Trump’s rise and fall from White House power and glory. Taking the narrative approach of some notable political comics such as David Frye and Alen Robin, this album concentrates on Trump’s special relationship with Putin as the orange-haired reality TV show host lays waste to the nation.

I will be voicing Donald Trump, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Alex Jones, Steve Bannon (Peter Lorre), Richard Nixon and Hillary Clinton.

Joining me in this crazy journey are a talented cast of characters:
Co-producer and co-star Tyler Pistorius voices Vladimir Putin, Stacy Keach, Bernie Sanders, Barack Obama and Michael Caine.

Robert Danzinger, Madison Tustin, Michelle Zaladonis, Dustin Puehler and Matthew Weinstein round out the cast with their varied impressions of Jared Kushner, Melania Trump, Ivanka Trump, Don Trump Jr., Mike Pence and many others!

The album was first conceived after the release of the book “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House” by Michael Wolff. I knew I had to temporarily stop everything–producing Vital Indie Media and a new card game–to take on this project. This was, for lack better phrasing, a calling.

With each passing day, new complications ensued. The prominence of Stormy Daniels, elevated from footnotes to headlines; and with her, the sudden surge of Michael Cohen. Chaotic firings and resignations, continued displays of authoritarian maneuvers and gross incompetency, and the eventual emerging indisputable reality that, yes, Russia did try to interfere (and got unnervingly deep) all occurred during the album’s recording and post production.

Writing the narrative over the course of two months, I was concerned about whether the material would lose relevancy. To my surprise, the album to this day actually gained relevancy, as evidenced by the Trump-Putin meeting this weekend.

Come to Sinema Obscura on Wednesday night and see if you agree.

Sinema Obscura TV Party (s2e7)
Wednesday, July 18th 7pm (album set to begin 9pm)
The Logan Theatre Lounge
2646 N Milwaukee Ave, Chicago

 

 

 

Latest Entertainment for Donald Trump’s Inauguration Announced

by Legendary Lew

I’m “proud” to announce the latest entertainers to join the Inauguration Day ceremonies. Here’s a video of one of their previous performances. It promises to make the day quite special.

SNL’s “Cut” Ferguson Sketch Shows NBC Knows TV’s Dwindling Importance

Kip (Kenan Thompson) and Jenny (Cecily Strong) try getting through a horrible news morning on their sunny TV show. Courtesy: NBC/YouTube

Kip (Kenan Thompson) and Jenny (Cecily Strong) try getting through a horrible news morning on their sunny TV show. Courtesy: NBC/YouTube

by Legendary Lew

This past weekend, NBC cut a sketch from Saturday Night Live that it claimed the long-running series did not have time to perform.  The comedy bit in question was the airing of a local St. Louis happy morning “news” show called “Rise and Smile St. Louis.” Co-hosts Kip and Jenny (Kenan Thompson and Cecily Strong) struggle to make it through the show the morning after riots rocked Ferguson.

Although, there certainly will be buzz over whether the network was too nervous to show the sketch, its airing on television, I think, is a moot point, especially when the bit made it online to YouTube and will be eventually be watched by more people than it would have on just TV alone.

A bigger point to raise is that it did get released publicly online while Ferguson, Eric Garner’s death and further issues of police brutality are fresh in the public’s mind.  Think Progress astutely points out this is a rare instance when SNL goes for a controversial and deeply evocative emotional issue head on.  If Jon Stewart didn’t know what to say, SNL sure did and did so terrifically:

The skit reminded me of some political comedy classics recorded on vinyl back in Charlie Manna - Rise & Fall Of The Great Societythe late 1960s and early 70s, when LP’s were practically the only serious outlet for very biting social commentary like this.  One of the few examples I could find of a comedy sketch on rioting done while the memories were still fresh was “Park Avenue Riots” by comic Charlie Manna and co-written by future “All in the Family” writer Michael Ross.

In fact, the other major TV parallel example of riot satire I could think of is the famed Harry Belafonte appearance on “The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” in 1968. Singing a medley of some of his famous tunes beginning with “Don’t Stop the Carnival,” the lyrics were reworked to match scenes of the the Chicago 1968 Democratic National Convention and riots, which had taken place only a few weeks prior.

CBS snipped this performance from the show and eventually the Brothers’ legendary fight with the network’s censorship issues led the network to break their contract and cancel the series.

Contrast the network’s decision with today: Belafonte’s performance could not be seen for many years. The SNL skit, however, can be seen online and shared freely. NBC may be nervous about airing it on a medium with older audiences, but understands how younger viewers consume their media. This understanding is, in fact, blurted out by Jenny in the morning show when she castigates Chef Darrell (SNL guest host James Franco) for inappropriate comments he makes while cooking up a frittata:

“Too late. You said it, and now we’re all on YouTube forever.”

NBC didn’t “cut the skit” for time. They knew it would live with a longer life of its own online, and indeed it does with currently over 2 million hits on YouTube. That popularity is another indication that TV, in its traditional form, is a dying medium. It needs the reach and relevance of the world wide web to be vital to young audiences and to provide voices and views that counter the mainstream.